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'll take your questions from hurricane sandy. is live on ournal c-span every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. fbi director in september. up next, president oh what is director's the ceremony at the fbi on monday. this is 40 minutes. >> please be seated, everybody. we only have a couple of seats today. good afternoon. everyone. deputy is shawn joys, director of the fbi. today we're truly honored to be barack y president obama. president? mr. president, on behalf of employee, it is my privilege to welcome you back to headquarters. we also have a number of special guests here today including webster, ectors sessions, and a special warm mullen back to director and his wife anne. attorney lcome former ashcroft and lieu lucasey. you with red to have us here today. i would also like to take a moment to acknowledge our guests president obama and the includingn the stage, robin dorch, a friend and colleague with whom to represent some of richmond's hardest hit eighborhoods, judge john walker, senior judge for the united states court of appeals for the second circuit. director was the first law clerk when
, on behalf of myry fbi employee, it is privilege to welcome you back to fbi headquarters. [applause] we also have a number of other special guests here today, including former directors. a special welcome back to former director mueller and his wife. we also welcome former attorney c --als ashcroft and mckay mccasey. i would also like to take a moment to it knowledge our obama joining president and director james comey on the stage. -- directoralker comey was his first law clerk when he was in the southern district of new york. comey's wife patrice. thank you for taking part in today's ceremony. also, the director's children. welcome. [applause] also, director comey's brother and sister. we welcome you. a special welcome to director comey's father. welcome. [applause] we are here today for two purposes. wast, director james comey sworn in in a privates or money privatember 4 -- ceremony on september 4. second, we wanted to be able to officially welcome director james comey and his family into the fbi's family. [applause] we are all honored to mark this thesion along with director's family an
of pictures this afternoon from fbi headquarters where president obama will deliver remarks at the installation ceremony for james call me, sworn in as fbi director last month, replacing robert moeller. a former deputy attorney general during the george w. bush administration. live coverage when it gets underway here on c-span. while we wait for that to get underway, a discussion from this morning's "washington journal." >> joining us to continue on a discussion about the health care law. joining us for the discussion, senior health correspondent. welcome. >> what is the latest? but unfortunately the sub contractors that runs the data hub had an outage last night. it was still down this morning. i checked before i arrived. yet another woe in the long saga that has dogged the website. there was a congressional hearing last night. they recommended more testing earlier. talked about how federal officials decided to turn off of browsing function that required a double make accounts. that created a backlog. a lot of attention and focus on the website. www.c-span.orghost: you get
inrticle the fbi. ands about -- mole hunt fbi. it is about 40 minutes. host: david wise is sitting with me. he has written several books about intelligence gathering. you have a story in the the recent addition of "smithsonian" magazine. set offt spy's tips one of the most self-destructive investigations in fbi history. when did this happen and how did it come about? guest: it is the first mole hunt. i broke that story. the fbi still will not talk about it. in 1962, a kgb agent in new york city walked into the fbi building in manhattan and volunteered his services. he said he was discontent and his talents were not being recognized. the fbi people said were to taking a big chance to walk into our building because you might have been seen? he said, no, i am not worried about it. our people are meeting with your guy, dick. uh-oh. that was telling the fbi that the russians had a mole inside the fbi and the russians called him dick. the fbi launched a mole hunt to try to find dick. because they did not know his real name, they called him an sub -- unsub, which stands for unknown subject. it t
addition of "smithsonian" magazine. "when the fbi spent decades hunting for a soviet spy on its staff." when did this happen, how did it come about? guest: it is the first mulholland. -- mole hunt. i broke that story. it was very secret. the fbi still will not talk about it. in 1962, a kgb agent in new york city walked into the fbi building in manhattan and volunteered his services. he said he was discontent and his talents were not being recognized. a familiar story. the fbi people said were to taking a big chance to walk into our building because you might have been seen? no doubt some of your people are looking into our building. he said, no, i am not worried about it. our people are meeting with your guy, dick. oh. that was telling the fbi that the russians had a mole inside the fbi and the russians called him dick. the fbi launched a mole hunt to try to find dick. because they did not know his real name, they called him an sub -- unsub, which stands for unknown subject. it turned the fbi upside down for a couple of decades. they are looking for this guy. host: the year that it al
in various capacities for the fbi, focusing on intelligence and weapons of mass instruction. to fort taken him hoover, and he also has been the on scene commander in iraq. is -- next to him is the ambassador cameron. he is a retired career diplomat now. he was the ambassador to pakistan from 2010 until 2012. he will have hair-raising stories about that relationship at a time when relations were not easy, including the capture .nd killing of osama bin laden before that he had an assignment in baghdad where he had responsibility for overseeing the planning of the drawdown of u.s. troops. he had a mission in the czech republic and poland. he served in the security counsel under president clinton and bush. is the senioreast staff attorney at the aclu southern california office. the distinction of having one important cases against the lapd over searching entertaining , and theyskid row were raiding african-american barbershops without a warrant. and haseen a law clerk a distinguished career both outside and inside the aclu. please join me and welcoming our distinguished panel. [applause] henry
" magazine. "when the fbi spent decades hunting for a soviet spy on its staff." when did this happen, how did it come about? guest: it is the first mulholland. hunt.e i broke that story. the fbi still will not talk about it. a kgb agent in new york city walked into the fbi building in manhattan and volunteered his services. he said he was discontent and his talents were not being recognized. said were toe taking a big chance to walk into our building because you might have been seen? no, i am not worried about it. our people are meeting with your guy, dick. that was telling the fbi that the russians had a mole inside the fbi and the russians called him dick. hunt tolaunched a mole try to find dick. because they did not know his real name, they called him an , which stands for unknown subject. upside downe fbi for a couple of decades. they are looking for this guy. host: the year that it all began? guest: 1962. was he ever caught? he or she? that's an interesting story. it was a he, as far as is known. was code-named fedora. as to whether or not he was telling the truth or trying to -- the bel
don't think so. i have written 14. host: his report deals with the first ever mole hunt within the fbi. "mole hunt" by david wise. "when the fbi spent decades hunting for a soviet spy on its staff." caller: i have a couple of comments and maybe a question. i enlisted in the marine corps as a security guard. during the time i was in the marine corps, i ran into a program where we had put people in foreign countries, czechoslovakia, hungary, poland, bulgaria, and they spoke the language and they were living as citizens of those countries and collecting intelligence on us. i'm not positive on the code name. i was going to apply for it. that has been going on for years. we have been collecting intelligence from our embassies and on top of everybody else's embassies, collecting some type of intelligence. we have a staff of snoops and we had -- people. i'm not sure the title. again form come debriefings all the time. they were very informative. the other thing -- we have been doing this -- we had the ability to listen when i was with the agency. i went with the agency in 1973, but we have th
is rafael garcia. he is a special agent in charge of intelligence at the f.b.i. n los angeles. mr. bill lewis was unable to participate and we're glad that george can represent the f.b.i. tonight. he is working various capacities since 199 5, focusing on terrorism and weapons of mass destruction. his work has taken him to what we call fort hoover in washington. f.b.i. headquarters and also has been the f.b.i.'s deputy on-scene commander in iraq. he was an army veteran before that. next to him is ambassador cameron mitchell -- sorry, cameron munter. cameron mitchell is somebody else. sorry. [laughter] not to be confused. i apologize. he is a retired career diplomat. a professor at international relations at pamona college. the ambassador to pakistan. therefore will have many hair-raising stories about that relationship in a period when u.s.-pakistani relations were, shall we say, not easy, including the capture and killing of osama bin laden. before that, he had an easy assignment in baghdad where he had responsibility for overseeing the planning for the drawdown of u.s. troops. before t
international partners, which is why we have in position throughout the world fbi agents and analysts who are out there as fbi employees working with our partners in law enforcement to make sure we do everything we can to not arrive at the situation you just described. when that is happening on the streets of an american city, even along the border, that is a local police matter where they have a responsibility to protect the public from harm and to address that immediate threat. we work closely with them to prevent that from happening in the first place through the relationships we have not only throught the fbi's work but also the state department. >> we have reached the hour that we have put aside for this. it has been a tremendous conversation. i would like to turn it back over to greg. >> i think i will stand around for a bit. if you have questions. i am bound to say the big issues we have talked about today are wonderful rand-like issues. data and analysis help. two as i see it -- technology and privacy. google knows a lot more about you and me than the federal government does. do w
are glad george can present the fbi tonight. he has worked in various capacities with the fbi since 1990 five, focusing on intelligence, counterterrorism, and weapons of mass destruction. his work has taken him to fort hoover in washington at fbi headquarters, but also has been the fbi's deputy on scene commander in iraq. he was an army veteran before that. next to him is ambassador me,ron mitchell -- excuse cameron munter. was ambassador to pakistan from 2010 22012. he will have many hair-raising stories about that relationship in a time when u.s. pakistani ,elations were not easy including the capture and killing of osama bin laden. before that he had an easy assignment in baghdad for he had responsibility for overseeing the drawdown of u.s. troops. before that he was ambassador to serbia, to be the chief and admission in the czech republic and poland. he is also served in the national security council under clinton, bush, and other departments. who but not least is peter is a senior staff attorney at the california office. he has these this -- he has the distinction of having importan
and internet data and the board will hear from the chief legal officers at the fbi, nsa, and the office of the director of national intelligence. that will be live at 9:15 a.m. on c-span2. importantthe tenants to the carrier is the idea that all americans, the matter where you live, should have access to affordable telecommunication services. as we got this evolution of going from playing telephone service to a broadband world, how do we ensure americans have access to the same services and the services that come across on those networks. we've been talking about how important it is to maintain the tenets of universal service. , what that means, and how that mechanism has allowed folks in -- folks to have customizable serpas -- services. bowlmparable lies a >> this week on q&a, stephen kinzer discusses his new book, titled "the brothers: john foster dulles, allen dulles, and their secret world war." >> stephen kinzer, in your book, : john foster dulles, allen dulles, and their secret world war," you tell a story up front about dulles airport in washington and the statue and the naming.
to see. prior to 9-11, we had no way of collecting those dots. nsa would see one side and the fbi the other. how can we connect these dots and do it in the least intrusive manner. , the senate, the executive branch, and the courts, we have programs to do that. you for yourthank comments. the statements you have made are greatly appreciated. and in then at nsa military still remembers that day and our commitment to those people that we will not forget. that does not mean we are going to trample on our civil liberties and privacy. how do we do both? wet is the constitution that all swore to uphold and defend. that's what we are doing. look at the program we have. citizens, everyone at this table is also an american citizen, have agreed we would take our personal data and put it into a lockbox. it would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulable suspicion that we had connection to a former -- foreign al qaeda or terrorist- related group. in 2012, we had 288 such selectors that we could go and look into that. that is it. of the billions of records, only 288. with that, w
of communication, whether with the fbi or the nsa. with the fbi, you have review in the field office. you would review at the fbi justiceters or, to the department and have a review there. and it would go to fisk and you would have a review there. and thee review meticulousness and the care that people put into these things is substantial. of dialogue back and forth between every level, among every level with this. there is back-and-forth with doj and fbi. i always took it as a huge amount of my response ability to make sure that i maintain at all times the credibility of the justice department in front of the five the court -- fisa court for muscle it was transparent what was going on. and when we made mistakes, as we did, we brought them to the attention of the court and we tried really hard not to make mistakes. it was really the justice doingment in my opinion his job, executing its responsibilities to order the constitution and the delegates were there to make sure that the properly.ecuted we will do our best to make sure it is enforced in the right way. if they have not met the standards,
with the fbi to prevent the two from poor -- forming a partnership and becoming all-powerful. if i were an organized crime, i can say this gangster is a threat to national security, and collection, but could not help us in our criminal case. 9/11, much was made about the culture of the agencies, and that was nonsense. spike and i formed partnership 1990's, and after these directives had gone out wouldcome law, nobody trust able legal, fundamental fact of our system, called the fourth amendment. when you're going to prosecute someone for a cruel case in the united states, the defendant is entitled to know how you investigate. how did you open it, what techniques did you use? wiretapping come a what was the basis of it? limited miniscule amount of information, the identity of a confidential informant that might have been used, could be withheld. defendant is a much entitled to everything. the agency is required to open the defense attorneys, to allow the defendant to see that. these directives, including the not, should did not, and will never address that. when we started to try to devel
of the fbi who took over in september. he previously served as deputy attorney general in the bush administration. he replaced robert mueller. this was held at fbi headquarters. this is 20 minutes. >> good afternoon, everybody. and so proud to be here stand with so many dedicated men and women of the fbi. you are the best of the best. day in and out, you work tirelessly to confront the most dangerous threats our nation faces. you served with courage. you served with integrity. you protect americans at home and abroad. .ou lock up criminals you secure the homeland against the threat of terrorism. without a lot of fanfare or seeking the spotlight, you do your jobs. all the while, upholding our most cherished values and the rule of law. bravery, integrity. that is your motto. today, we're here to welcome a remarkable new leader for this one whole institution, lives those principles out every single day. jim, i want to thank all of the predecessors here today. we're grateful for your service. i have to give a special shout who servedmueller longer than he was supposed to. but he was su
. with the secret clearance is there is an f.b.i. check. we get the f.b.i. database and they reveal arrests. it does not reveal the disposition of cases that are handled at the state and local level. and so the f.b.i. record revealed that mr. alexis had been charged and arrested for what was called malicious mischief and under the existing standards, our job or the job of the contractor, in this case, was to go out and find out what the disposition of that charge was and to find out more information about the charge. now, some have questioned now why o.p.m.'s investigators did not go get a police report. well, the reason that a police report was not obtained was because, you know, there were like 1,700 localities, law enforcement jurisdictions. they all have different rules about what they're going to supply to us. in this case, we had experience with seattle. seattle did not provide police reports and they have their own good reasons, i'm sure. but -- so what we were referred to by seattle was the state database. the state of washington, their court records and that's where we went. that revealed t
. all we need to do is associate a number and give that to the fbi and let them deal with that. this is a hugely important point that you brought up, because i think it is important for the american people to understand that we are not collecting the contents of their e-mail or their phones. we are not listening to that. you see that coming around. we don't have that information, nor do we collect that. we have what is in the business record of fisa and what is authorized under a fisa court weren't. -- war and. warant. and is a huge point, think a lot of people assume that because we can, we are. but the fact is this system has tremendous oversight and controls. it is focused. and if we make a mistake, even a transition, we report it. and we have not seen anybody, over the -- other than those 12 cases over a decade, of anyone going out and collecting .nformation on u.s. persons and if we find someone doing it, we will hold them accountable, guaranteed. just want to make a point that a lot of private companies in this country have a lot more information on our citizens and what
rice -- there was an fbi discovered the terrorist trying to steer plans in the land, stand down, and all he -- host: caller you are breaking up a little bit here to let me put you on hold and see if we can get a better connection with you. you are cutting in and out. i want to make sure you get a chance to talk fully to our guest here and we will put you on hold. diana from california, democrat line. hi. caller: hi, there, first time caller. your guess just finished saying that we have to get the trust of the american people. i am a lifelong government -- democrat. feinstein'sne office, al raged it -- outraged that she is supporting this violation of our constitutional rights that i have never been more active in following the hearings that the senate, at the congress level. i will never, ever again vote for a democrat that supports the status quo. now, you are supposed to be concerned about restoring trust of the average citizen -- it is never going to happen when we go see clapper fired at the minimum to ourhting to -- lyringying representatives speared we are not stupid. we h
employees and contractors, including many who work for the c.i.a., the f.b.i., the state department, and the defense department, i know from years of firsthand experience how agencies can sometimes use various forms of pressure and intimidation to keep employees from sharing information of concern with congress. i know the benghazi survivors and other witnesses that night need the protection of a friendly subpoena to compel their testimony before congress, particularly on matters as sensitive as this, in order to protect them. so far the committees have failed to provide this protection to allow survivors and other witnesses, to allow them to share their story publicly so the american people can hear them. based on disclosures in recent news reports, i now believe that the benghazi plot represents a significant intelligence failure by the united states at several levels. understanding these failures as well as the government's inexplicable response during and after the attack, is critical to preventing future attacks. i want to outline a number of apparent intelligence failures lead
hunt in the fbi. live every morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. former house speaker tom foley must his bid for reelection in 1994 after he agreed to keep them assault weapons ban even though gun control was unpopular in his district. he was honored at a memorial service at statuary hall by president obama among bill clinton, and his friend and rival, bob michael. he died on october 18. he was 84. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the presentation of the colors, the singing of the national anthem, and the retiring of the colors. >> forward march. >> present. ♪ oh, say, can you see by the dawn's early light, what so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming? whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming? and the rockets red glare the bombs bursting in air nightroof through the that our flag was still there. say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave o'er the land of the free brave?
to hear you say no more surveillance. keep it going, now. i'm flyer for the fbi. i'm flyer for the cia. no more no more no more surveillance a little bit louder, i like it like that, now. no more surveillance, keep your internet navigating, keep the internet navigating, got to fight the powers that be, got to fight the powers that be, got to fight the powers that be, keep it going like that, y'all. keep it going like that, y'all keep it going like that, y'all let them hear you in the white house let them hear you with those big old years. let them hear you with those big old ears let them hear you when they are tapping your phone's. let them hear you when they are tapping your phones. fuck the nsa. ♪ >> sexual chocolate. clap your hands, not-for-profit. all right, coming to the stage, we have dennis kucinich, former member of congress and two-time presidential candidate. friends and enemies, brothers and sisters, dennis kucinich. [applause] >> thank you. we are gather this afternoon before our nation's capital to call for an end to the spying and an end to the lying. 12 years ago ame
-span 3. off capitol hill, president obama is at fbi headquarters this afternoon. you will deliver remarks at the installation ceremony of james komi who was sworn in as fbi director last month. you can watch that live online at c-span.org. honoring jeb bush with its annual leadership award, the ceremony will include remarks by john boehner and south carolina senator tim scott. you can see that live at 7:30 p.m. eastern on c-span 3. the courtship of beth wallace and harry truman began here at her home in independence, missouri. >> when my grandfather visited independence, 26 miles from where he lived at the time in 1910, he often stayed across the street at the nolan house, which is where his aunt and two cousins live. one afternoon he was over there with his cousins with the family and his aunt brought in a cake late that my great-grandmother this isn her a cake and nolan had cleaned the cake plate and was asking if anybody would take it back over. whatandfather moved with my mother once described as something approaching the speed of light and grabbed the cake plate and ran over here and
to the fbi so they can follow up on it. missouri,o jerry from a republican caller. caller: good morning. excuse my speech. go ahead with your comment. caller: i am opposed to spying on americans. i just think it is wrong. i don't think there is any good in it, i don't think there is anything that will come out of it -- out of it. garrison new hampshire, republican caller. new hampshire, republican caller. i am opposed to the nsa spying. they should be ashamed of themselves. the department of homeland security, the nsa, they should all be removed. congress gave away our right after 9/11. they gave their rights away to the president. that is our voice, our rights. they need to take that back and rain and the nsa and the government. they are going crazy. john is next, a republican from louisiana. a lot of the nsa spying is due to the technology. it used to be a scanner is all you had. now it is on a global magnitude. what are they intended to target somebody, i believe that comes under the fisa court. to fact they listen something is basically because they can. it would be physically impos
legal system like the fbi or what ever, checking into this extortion? we have been extorted. i don't think we can get by thehner mugshotted fbi on charges of extortion but your larger point is right. the tea party folks are a minority of the republican party but yet they are the tail that wags the dog. they do not believe in compromise. i go back to the story i put up about ted cruz's father and the speeches he's given on behalf of his son at tea party republican events and he says we have had enough of compromise. he said we have enough of established republicans and we don't want to compromise. it seems to me that is not a fair reading of what the founders had in mind when they created our system. they created a system that is hard to pass legislation, a lot of checks and balances, but they did that purposely to make things slow but to force people to come together and work things out in a deliberative fashion. i don't think they envision people misusing the roles or the system to say no and if you don't do this my way, i will blow up the economy with a default or the debt crisi
legal system like the f.b.i. or whatever that's checking into this extortion? we have been extorted. guest: i don't think we can get john boehner mugshotted by the fbi on charges of extortion but your larger point is right. the tea party folks are a minority of the republican party but yet they are the tail that wags the dog. they do not believe in compromise. i go back to the story i put up this morning about ted cruz's father and the speeches he's given on behalf of his son at tea party republican events and he says we have had enough of compromise. we've had enough of established republicans, we don't want compromise. it seems to me that is not a fair reading of what the founders had in mind when they created our system. they created a system that is hard to pass legislation, a lot of checks and balances, but they did that purposely to make things slow but to force people to come together and work things out in a deliberative fashion. i don't think they envision people misusing the roles or the system to say no and if you don't do this my way, i will blow up the economy with a de
. the serviceproud award has been presented to many distinguished law enforcement officials at the fbi, cia, u.s. customs service. the list of prior recipients is in your program and i think you will agree it is an impressive roster of great americans. tonight, as you heard, we honor leon panetta, who has given much of his life to public service and has left an indelible mark in the fight against terrorism and extremism. history will probably remember him as the director of the central intelligence agency who launched a successful operation to bring osama bin laden to justice. as secretary of defense, he kept his commitment to keep america strong while working to end america's involvement in iraq and transition and exit from afghanistan. under his stewardship, cooperation between the united states and israel to face, and challenges, defense it grew to it on presented at -- unprecedented level. leon panetta has been there reaching out to consult with israel on terrorist threats and to ensure israel's military superiority. proud that hisly early fact-finding trips to mission inin adl together wi
they have been arrested. we do enough the eye check -- we do an fbi check. it will spit out whether someone has been arrested and then we do the follow-up and it requires work on a state-by-state races or local jurisdiction. let's remember, we are talking in his case about a secret clearance. if it was a top sear. -- if it was a top secret clearance, a would have taken a greater investigation that may have uncovered the gun part of this and speculation. >> if i can take it one step further, we are talking about revoking a clearance. what about requiring that that employment be terminated? is that one of the things that you're considering and looking at him going forward, the this person -- for contractors, that is a tough call here but for government employment, it is not enough to just revoke the clearance. i think that it should be prima facie, a case that you now lose your job. that has to be serious consequences for not reporting. the have to be serious consequences for lying. and we have to look at the number of people who are out there who are not currently self reporting because, eve
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)